The legality of closing libraries

Elizabeth May, MP for Saanich-Gulf Islands and Leader of the Green Party, investigates the legality of the recent culling of federal government libraries and collections:

The Act covering publications and records held by the Government of Canada is the Library and Archives of Canada Act. In reviewing it, it seems clear the act was not followed. The Library and Archives of Canada Act exists to protect and preserve our ‘documentary heritage’. The Act’spreamble makes it clear that Parliament recognizes the importance of protecting knowledge as a critical part of any democratic society.

The Act established a set of protections for all government records held by any and all departments. The mandate to protect and maintain the documentary heritage of Canada is held by the Librarian and Archivist for Canada. The current Librarian and Archist is Hervé Déry—appointed in May 2013 on an interim basis.

According to the Act,

12. (1) No government or ministerial record, whether or not it is surplus property of a government institution, shall be disposed of, including by being destroyed, without the written consent of the Librarian and Archivist …..

Under s. 16, all publications (even if surplus) must be moved to the care and control of the Librarian and Archivist.

I decided to phone the Librarian and Archivist of Canada, who has a very clear responsibility to protect the ‘documentary heritage’ of Canadians. It took over a week to get the current interim Librarian and Archivist on the phone. And when I did, it turned out two officials from Heritage Canada were in the room as ‘observers.’ Mr Déry confirmed that he has not provided any written authorizations for the destruction of documents. He claimed it is none of his business if records, books and research are destroyed as it is in the ‘discretion of the ministers.’

 

http://elizabethmaymp.ca/news/publications/island-tides/2014/02/06/shutting-down-our-libraries-broke-the-law/

Rogers Removes Digital Magazines From Canadian Libraries, No Longer Accessible with Zinio

Rogers removes digital magazines from Canadian libraries

STEVE LADURANTAYE – MEDIA REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Nov. 05 2013.

 

Visitors to Canadian libraries will no longer have access to free digital magazines from Canada’s largest publisher.

Magazines Canada, an industry trade group, advised Canadian publishers to walk away from an agreement with the company whose software makes the publications available because of delivery problems. Rogers Media complied, and its magazines are no longer available on the popular Zinio app.

 

 

Rogers Removes Digital Magazines From Canadian Libraries, No Longer Accessible with Zinio.

Infodocket

Filed by on November 5, 2013

 

 

Here’s a list of some of their French and English language consumer and business press publications:

E-readers in the library and hopefully out of it

My library is introducing an e-reader lending program. The price of e-readers has dropped such that this is practical for a library in a community of our size. This is a good article about our new program, however it does adopt the cliche of libraries being strangers to new technology.

Library embracing new technology with e-readers

By SHERI REGNIER January 30, 2014 · Updated 11:48 AM
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(Librarian Sam King demonstrated the versatility of the Trail and District Public Library’s new e-readers set for community circulation in a few months. Options on the portable device include large text and with the tap of a finger, a page can be bookmarked or turned. / Sheri Regnier)

 

How a future library will look is anyone’s guess.

But in this digital age, a library might become less about lending a book and more about transmitting text through less traditional sources.

The Trail and District Public Library reports an exponential increase of tech-savvy users in the last few years, aided by the addition of 12 public access computers, along with the circulation of electronic materials increasing by 63 per cent.

As local library users become more familiar with digitized information, the modern way to access materials through e-readers could mean books, CDs and DVDs become an antiquated resource for future readers.

The current 5,000-square-foot Trail facility is packed with countless tactile resources, so in response to not just a lack of space, but to keep up with the times, the library has added 10 e-readers to its stock of portable devices, and tens of thousands of books to its electronic library.

http://www.bclocalnews.com/community/242804881.html?mobile=true