BandMusic PDF Library

BandMusic PDF Library

Intro

Who Are We?

We are BandMusic PDF Library, conservators and stewards of our band music heritage from the time of John Philip Sousa, Karl L. King, Henry Fillmore and all the other great composers who were active during the Golden Age of the American Town Band.

Our special focus is public domain music from the 1880s through 1922.

Beginnings

Music from this time period was donated to North Royalton (Ohio) Community Band — boxes and boxes and boxes of time-worn, brown-edged sheet music.

Most pages were too fragile to hand out so we decided to scan the music. Once everything was scanned, the next logical step was to share it with other bands. Just in time, our first webmaster, Graham Nasby, stepped up and agreed to create a library website and host it.

The Library became a non-profit corporation in 2006.

As always, there is no charge for downloading and using these band treasures.

All music in BandMusic PDF Library is copyright-free in the USA. Visitors from other countries — please determine that you are complying with your country’s copyright regulations, which may differ from those of the USA.

http://www.bandmusicpdf.org/intro.html

Relocation/Dismantling of the UBC Music Library

Music Library collections

Plan to relocate UBC’s music library opposed

A plan to relocate UBC’s music library to a different part of the university’s Vancouver campus has outraged students and faculty.

The university hopes to cut costs by moving the entire collection of materials stored in the UBC School of Music building to the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Music-library staff positions are also to be reduced to three from six.

However, members of the university’s music community are concerned about the removal of the library from the music-school building and have voiced opposition to the plan.

“The location of the library is important for us,” Richard Kurth, director of the UBC School of Music, told the Straight. “We use the collection intensively throughout the day and we’re constantly accessing it.”

http://www.straight.com/arts/plan-relocate-ubcs-music-library-opposed

UBC music community gathers at town hall to keep library in-house

By: September 19, 2012, 11:30am PST

UBC’s music library could move to a new home, and some members of the School of Music aren’t happy about it.

UBC plans to merge the music library into the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in order to save money and space, but the School of Music community thinks the move will harm their program’s quality and reputation. Music students, faculty and alumni packed the Roy Barnett Recital Hall on September 18 for a town hall meeting to voice their objections to the change.

UBC plans to move the entire music library collection, which currently sits on the fourth floor of the Music Building, to the third-floor book stacks of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. UBC also plans to reduce the number of music librarians by half, from six librarians down to three.

“The theme of the presentation is ‘Libraries are changing’; the subtitle could easily have been, ‘But budgets are not growing,’” said Melody Burton, deputy university librarian, at the town hall meeting.

http://www.straight.com/arts/plan-relocate-ubcs-music-library-opposed

Record collector buys CBC Vancouver’s vinyl motherlode

Alas…
[edit for broken link]

http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/Jamie+Anstey+buys+Vancouver+record+collection/6710751/story.html

Jamie Anstey has just purchased the mother of all Vancouver record collections – CBC Vancouver’s record library.

And that’s records, not com-pact discs. About 50,000, in fact: 37,913 LPs, 11,780 45s, 492 78s and 462 records that are listed as “miscellaneous.”

The collection had been built up since 1958, but was put up for sale when the CBC decided to centralize its music archives at a “virtual music library” in Toronto.

The purchase price was not disclosed, but is believed to be in the $10,000 range.

The library also included 31,000 CDs that the CBC is donating to two unnamed public institutions. The CBC tried to give away the records, but found no takers, so sold them.